• Versioning:
    • Traditional humanities scholarship can be "finished." Once research and scholarship has been offered up for publication, it can be safely set aside, barring the occasional notes at the front of a new edition.
    • DH, however, can be more iterative. You can always go back and add to/subtract from a project.
  • Prototyping:
    • Because DH is a process, it encourages experimentation. Knowing that a project can always be edited and changed allows a freedom to try innovative methods of conducting and displaying research.
    • Experimentation also allows for the implementation of prototypes - ideas that are not fully fleshed out but are given to the public for consumption in order to receive feedback regarding the efficacy of the scholarship / research.
    • Experimentation necessarily means that failures will occur sometimes. As such, DH has a "psychology of failure" built into it, i.e., an understanding that a project may not always work out - and that's ok!
    • This mirrors Silicon Valley start-ups that factor the "cost of failure" into their operational costs.